April 1st Fool's Day Experimental Art Works at Carmacazzi Dub Plates

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April 1st Fool's Day Experimental Art Works at Carmacazzi Dub Plates

Joseph Gray
April 1st Fool's Day Experimental Art Works at Carmacazzi Dub Plates

Opening Reception: April 1 st at 6pm, Music 10pm.
Runs: April 1-30, 2006
Gallery Hours: Noon to 5:00pm Wednesday through Saturday

Carmacazzi Dub Plates
1423 10th Avenue {Lower Level} Seattle
(206) 329-1958


Coming together at Carmacazzi Dub Plates are an eclectic group of
artists which span both traditional and new media. Paintings,
Sculpture, Audio & Video Art all mix together to make an aesthetic brew
of the new frontier for the arts in Seattle.

Participating Artists include: Casey Cahoy, Joseph Gray, Light
Habersetzer, Gene Lange, Marcel Marias, Timmie Marsden, Jonathan
Mitten, Kevin Olsen, Pixel8, Kendal Tull-Esterbrook, & Cait Willis.
Opening Reception: April 1 st at 6pm, Music 10pm. Carmacazzi Dub
Plates, 1423 10 th Avenue {Lower Level} Seattle. (206) 329-1958 Hours:
Noon to 5:00pm Wednesday through Saturday
 
To learn more visit:

http://www.carmacazzi.com/aprilFools.php



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.........dorkbot: people doing strange things with electricity..........
..........................http://dorkbot.org............................
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In-depth look at Visual Perception

Michael Clarke
For those dorks who play with light or illusion, or otherwise just have an
interest in the science of visual perception, here's a free online course
by Stanford prof (of Electrical Engineering and Psychology) Brian Wandell.

-Mike


http://www.pge.com/education_training/classes/energy_efficiency/index.jsp?reqType=detail&ID=1929&db=PEC1929.csv&pageTitle=Class%20Details%20and%20Registration&postback=yes

 Agenda
9:00 am   Image Formation
- How the cornea, pupil and lens form the retinal image
- Point spread functions
- Glare
10:00 am   Encoding Light
- How the light sensitive receptors in the retina (rods and cones) absorb
light
- Light sensitivity; wavelength sensitivity
- Differences in foveal and peripheral vision
10:45 am   Break
11:00 am Color Matching
- Why is color three-dimensional?
- Matching color appearance
- How the properties of the cones explain color matching
12:00 pm   Lunch break
1:00 pm   Spatial and Temporal Sensitivity of the Visual System
- Seeing spatial detail; contrast sensitivity; vernier acuity
- Temporal flicker sensitivity; the temporal modulation transfer function
- High dynamic range images; light and dark adaptation
2:00 pm   Appearance
- What illusions teach us
- Depth perception
- Contrast and lightness illusions
- Motion illusions
3:00 pm   Break
3:15 pm   Processing in Visual Cortex
- The organization of cortical layers and maps
- The multiplicity of cortical maps
- Consequences of cortical damage
- Methods of measuring structure and function in human cortex
4:15 pm   Wrap-up
4:30 pm   Conclusion

Brian Wandell graduated from the University of Michigan in 1973 with a
B.S. in mathematics and psychology. In 1977, he earned a Ph.D. in social
science from the University of California at Irvine. After a year as a
postdoctoral fellow at the University of Pennsylvania, he joined the
faculty of Stanford University in 1979. Professor Wandell was promoted to
associate professor with tenure in 1984 and became a full professor in
1988.

Brian Wandell's research includes image system engineering and visual
neuroscience. Professor Wandell co-founded the Stanford's Image Systems
Engineering Program. As part of this research, Wandell and his team study
and build devices used for digital imaging, including image sensors, high
dynamic range displays, and software simulations of the digital imaging
pipeline.

Professor Wandell's work in visual neuroscience uses both functional MRI
and behavior testing to explore the action of the visual portions of the
brain. His team has developed a set of methods for identifying and
measuring the signals in several visual areas within the human brain,
including regions that respond powerfully to motion and color. Recently,
his team measured the reorganization of brain function during human
development and following brain injury; they are now actively studying the
development of visual signals during the age period in which children are
learning to read as well as changes to cortex caused by retinal
dysfunction.

Brian Wandell's teaching at Stanford reflects his multiple areas of
expertise. He has taught courses on behavior, perception, cognitive and
behavioral neuroscience, image systems and computational neuroimaging. He
has also led classes on color science and computer applications for
engineers and managers from more than 200 companies. In addition to
numerous scientific articles, Brian Wandell is the author of the vision
science textbook Foundations of Vision. He is an associate editor of the
Journal of Vision, the Journal of Neuroscience, and Neural Networks. He
has served as a consultant and technical advisor for a number of
corporations and has patented some of the products of his work.

........................................................................
.........dorkbot: people doing strange things with electricity..........
..........................http://dorkbot.org............................
........................................................................