A local source for machinable ceramic rod

classic Classic list List threaded Threaded
4 messages Options
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|  
Report Content as Inappropriate

A local source for machinable ceramic rod

Michael Shiloh
I've never done this, but I hear that ceramic is machinable. 

I'd like to replace the tips in this really nice third hand:


with ceramic tips that don't conduct heat, so that the clamp doesn't suck all the heat out of whatever I'm trying to solder. 

I figure I need two pieces about 2"-3" by perhaps 1/8" diameter.

Where can I get this material?

Is there another material that might work better or be less expensive? Teflon perhaps? It doesn't need to be super precise, as long as I can grasp say a single pin from a .1" header.

Is there a better solution to this problem? Do you know of third hands with tips made out of non heat-conductive material?  

Michael


--
unsubscribe: http://bit.ly/dblunsub
dorkbotlondon: http://dorkbotlondon.org
more dorkbots: http://dorkbot.org
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|  
Report Content as Inappropriate

Re: A local source for machinable ceramic rod

Aras Vaichas
Solution: don't attach your third hand to the part that you are trying to solder.

The reason that third hands are made of heat conductive metal is that you're not supposed to attach them to something that gets hot.

It sounds to me like you're using the third hand incorrectly.

If you really think that you need to do this, then simply place an insulating layer between the jaws and the object. e.g. cardboard. 

Aras

On Fri, Jul 17, 2015 at 11:34 PM, Michael Shiloh <[hidden email]> wrote:
I've never done this, but I hear that ceramic is machinable. 

I'd like to replace the tips in this really nice third hand:


with ceramic tips that don't conduct heat, so that the clamp doesn't suck all the heat out of whatever I'm trying to solder. 

I figure I need two pieces about 2"-3" by perhaps 1/8" diameter.

Where can I get this material?

Is there another material that might work better or be less expensive? Teflon perhaps? It doesn't need to be super precise, as long as I can grasp say a single pin from a .1" header.

Is there a better solution to this problem? Do you know of third hands with tips made out of non heat-conductive material?  

Michael


--
unsubscribe: http://bit.ly/dblunsub
dorkbotlondon: http://dorkbotlondon.org
more dorkbots: http://dorkbot.org


--
unsubscribe: http://bit.ly/dblunsub
dorkbotlondon: http://dorkbotlondon.org
more dorkbots: http://dorkbot.org
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|  
Report Content as Inappropriate

Re: A local source for machinable ceramic rod

Mike Harrison-4
In reply to this post by Michael Shiloh
On Fri, 17 Jul 2015 15:34:38 -0700, you wrote:

>I've never done this, but I hear that ceramic is machinable.

There are ceramics that are designed to be machinable. Macor is one

>I'd like to replace the tips in this really nice third hand:
>
>http://www.ottofrei.com/GRS-004-570-Double-Soldering-Station-With-2-Third-Hands.html
>
>with ceramic tips that don't conduct heat, so that the clamp doesn't suck
>all the heat out of whatever I'm trying to solder.

Ceramic is a pretty good conductor of heat.
>
>I figure I need two pieces about 2"-3" by perhaps 1/8" diameter.
>
>Where can I get this material?

RS
http://uk.rs-online.com/web/c/abrasives-engineering-materials/ceramic-rods-sheets-beads/ceramic-rods-bars/

>Is there another material that might work better or be less expensive?
>Teflon perhaps? It doesn't need to be super precise, as long as I can grasp
>say a single pin from a .1" header.
>
>Is there a better solution to this problem? Do you know of third hands with
>tips made out of non heat-conductive material?

It probably isn't a big issue in practice - keeping the contact area small is probably the easiest
way. Silicone sleeve might be an option.
If you are having issues, chances are your iron is under-powered.
--
unsubscribe: http://bit.ly/dblunsub
dorkbotlondon: http://dorkbotlondon.org
more dorkbots: http://dorkbot.org
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|  
Report Content as Inappropriate

Re: A local source for machinable ceramic rod

Michael Shiloh
Thanks Mike. Now that I know the name (Macor), I see it is widely available (e.g. http://ww4.aitsafe.com/cf/add.cfm?userid=65286121&product=Macor+1/8+dia.+x+3+Long&price=9). However your comment that "Ceramic is a pretty good conductor of heat" means this won't work for my purpose.

I will try Teflon and see if it is rigid enough for my needs.

Thanks anyway! This has been very educational. Perhaps in the future I'll find a use for Macor.

Michael



On Sat, Jul 18, 2015 at 2:13 AM, Mike Harrison <[hidden email]> wrote:
On Fri, 17 Jul 2015 15:34:38 -0700, you wrote:

>I've never done this, but I hear that ceramic is machinable.

There are ceramics that are designed to be machinable. Macor is one

>I'd like to replace the tips in this really nice third hand:
>
>http://www.ottofrei.com/GRS-004-570-Double-Soldering-Station-With-2-Third-Hands.html
>
>with ceramic tips that don't conduct heat, so that the clamp doesn't suck
>all the heat out of whatever I'm trying to solder.

Ceramic is a pretty good conductor of heat.
>
>I figure I need two pieces about 2"-3" by perhaps 1/8" diameter.
>
>Where can I get this material?

RS
http://uk.rs-online.com/web/c/abrasives-engineering-materials/ceramic-rods-sheets-beads/ceramic-rods-bars/

>Is there another material that might work better or be less expensive?
>Teflon perhaps? It doesn't need to be super precise, as long as I can grasp
>say a single pin from a .1" header.
>
>Is there a better solution to this problem? Do you know of third hands with
>tips made out of non heat-conductive material?

It probably isn't a big issue in practice - keeping the contact area small is probably the easiest
way. Silicone sleeve might be an option.
If you are having issues, chances are your iron is under-powered.
--
unsubscribe: http://bit.ly/dblunsub
dorkbotlondon: http://dorkbotlondon.org
more dorkbots: http://dorkbot.org


--
unsubscribe: http://bit.ly/dblunsub
dorkbotlondon: http://dorkbotlondon.org
more dorkbots: http://dorkbot.org
Loading...