7:00PM! Re: Introductory Arduino Workshop!

classic Classic list List threaded Threaded
1 message Options
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

7:00PM! Re: Introductory Arduino Workshop!

-dustin younse-
you'd think an internet professional like myself would learn to proof
important emails before sending them out.

7pm!  the workshop will be taking place at 7pm!

it has been asked if a lilypad would suffice as the arduino - as far
as i know, yes it would.  it has the same brains as the standard
arduino, just in a different physical package.  the LoLshield will not
work, you'll need your own LEDs to work with.

-dustin younse-



On Tue, Nov 30, 2010 at 11:19 PM, -dustin younse- <[hidden email]> wrote:

> Introductory Arduino Workshop
>
> Monday, December 6th
> UT-Austin, CMB Building
> Studio 4E (not our usual meeting room)
> http://www.utexas.edu/maps/main/buildings/cmb.html
>
> Our instructor, Brandon Wiley (http://blanu.net/) will be walking us
> through Charlieplexing (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Charlieplexing),
> a method of addressing multiple LEDs while conserving I/O pins on a
> microcontroller.  This will cover both hardware and software.  If you
> do not have time to acquire the parts, feel free to use the DorkbotATX
> mailing list and Facebook page to try and team up or borrow parts.  If
> all goes well, we certainly plan on having more of these events in the
> future, on a variety of Arduino-esque topics.
>
> Here's the parts list:
>
> Required
> 1. Arduino
> 2. LoLShield
>        OR
>    LEDs and breadboard
>        OR
>    LED Christmas lights, wire cutters, wire strippers, and breadboard
> 3. Resistors, ideally 270 Ohm, although other ratings can be made to
> work (enough to match the number of LEDs you have)
>
> Optional
> 1. Laptop with Arduino IDE installed and USB A-B cable - if you want
> to mess around with the source code on your own
>
> There is no soldering required for this class. We will just be
> prototyping and learning the principles. The LolShield is the fastest
> way to get started. You just plug it into the Arduino, download the
> code, and you're ready to go. If you are more interested in the
> software, get one of these. It's also $25, so if you are on a budget
> or are more interested in the hardware side, just bring a bunch of
> LEDs. I'd recommend at least 8. A single string of LED Christmas
> lights should have all the LEDs you need, but you'll need a couple of
> tools to get the prepare them for plugging into a breadboard.
>
> If you have any questions, please let me know.
>
> -dustin younse-
>
........................................................................
.........dorkbot: people doing strange things with electricity..........
......................... http://dorkbot.org ...........................
........................................................................